Canine Good Citizen (CGC)

The Canine Good Citizen programme is designed to teach you and

your dog valuable practical exercises. While not as "formal" as the

classic obedience classes, the CGC programme still requires

precise obedience, but within a more realistic context. These

courses are ideal for those looking to train their dog to be a

reliable steady companion in domestic scenarios.

All the CGC levels incorporate typical domestic obedience situations - from meeting a stranger (Bronze) to an out of sight stay (Gold). There are three incremental levels - Bronze, Silver and Gold. We suggest that the dog and handler complete the Elementary Beginner obedience course prior to enrolling in the Bronze CGC. Hundreds of dogs have achieved the various levels of CGC at McKaynine over the years and we consider this one of our proudest achievements - domestic manners is where it’s at! We were the first training school in South Africa to offer CGC training courses in 2002. It is very heartening to see how many other schools and clubs have followed our innovative lead since then.  All final tests are non-competitive but the examiner must be satisfied that dogs are worthy of passing. In order that it be meaningful the testing is carried out rigorously - we are very serious about awarding a McKaynine CGC and maintain a very high standard. A rosette will be awarded when the required standard has been achieved. Click on the buttons below to read about the various grade components... CGC Bronze This level aims to produce a dog that will walk and behave in a controlled manner on the lead, will stay in one position on command, will allow its owner to clean, groom and inspect it. The dog must also be able to be positioned by its handler for inspection i.e. stand, sit or lie down on either side or on its back, all on lead. The dog must come to hand when called. 1. Accepting a stranger - This test is to see that a stranger can approach the dog and handler in a casual, everyday situation. 2. Groom - The evaluator will inspect the dog to see if it appears healthy, is clean and groomed and will permit a stranger such as a vet or groomer to examine it. 3. Putting on a collar and lead - The dog should have a well fitting buckle or slip collar of leather, fabric or chain. Special collars such as pinch or spike collars are not permitted. 4. Present for examination on lead - The purpose of this test is to see if a judge or vet can examine the dog without it becoming aggressive or flinching. 5. Praise/presentation - The test is to demonstrate that a dog can be calmed easily following praise and play and can leave the test in a well-mannered fashion. 6. Release from lead, play with or without toy, recall and attach lead - The purpose of this test is to see if the dog can play happily off lead and be recalled and be put on a lead. 7. Walk on lead without distraction (walking on a loose lead) - The purpose of this test is to demonstrate that the handler is in control. The dog must be on the left side of handler, but need not be in the "heel" position. 8. Walk on lead passing through a door or gate - Dog should walk confidently through door/gate and should not shy away from it. 9. Reaction to another dog - This test is to demonstrate the proper behaviour in the presence of other dogs. 10. Walk on a lead passing people and dogs - The test is to demonstrate that the dog should have no difficulty in walking through pedestrian traffic. The dog will walk around and close to several persons at least four, one of whom should have a dog. 11. Reaction to distractions - This test is to demonstrate the dog is confident at all times when facing a distraction. 12. Lie down and stay to command - Taking reasonable time, the handler commands the dog first to sit and then to lie down, using as many commands as he likes. He must not force the dog into the position. The stay command is given and the handler walks about seven metres from the dog and returns at a natural walking pace to the dog, which must maintain it position until the handler returns and the evaluator gives permission for the dog to move. 13. Supervised isolation - This test is to demonstrate a dog can be left with another person, whilst maintaining its training and good manners. CGC Silver This level aims to build upon the skills learned in the Bronze Award whilst increasing the level of difficulty. The Silver Award is a natural progression of practical dog training skills and introduces new concepts such as the Controlled Greeting, Road Walk and Vehicle Control exercises which are important in everyday life situations.  1. Play with the dog - The object is to demonstrate that the dog will play with its handler. When instructed to do so the handler should commence to play with the dog. Play should be under the handler's control and if it involves articles the dog should readily give them up. 2. Road walk - The object is to test the ability of the dog to walk on lead under control. This exercise should be carried out at a suitable outdoor location and an occasional tight lead will be acceptable. The handler and dog should walk along a pavement, execute a turn and then stop at the kerb where the dog should remain steady and controlled. Having observed the Highway Code, they should proceed to the other side, turn and continue walking. Distractions should be incorporated such as passing vehicles or bicycles, people, wheelchairs, prams, pushchairs, etc. 3. Rejoin handler - The object is for the dog to remain steady while the handler leaves but the dog will rejoin when instructed to do so. 4. Stay in one place for two minutes - The object is that the dog will stay on the spot while the handler moves away for two minutes. The handler should remain in sight. 5. Vehicle Control - The object is for the handler to get the dog in and out of a vehicle in a controlled manner. Without pulling, the dog should be taken on lead towards a vehicle and remain steady whilst the handler opens the vehicle door. The dog should not attempt to get in until instructed but should then enter willingly and the door should be closed. The handler, examiner and, if necessary, a driver will get into the vehicle. The engine should be started and run for a short time to enable the examiner to assess the effect upon the dog which at all times should remain quiet, relaxed, and under control. The dog will then be instructed to exit in an orderly manner. The handler should then close the door with the dog calmly under control. Note: Dogs may be lifted in and out of the vehicle. 6. Come away from distractions - The object is for the handler to remain in control of their dog when there are distractions. The handler should take the dog, on lead, to a gathering of people with dogs also on lead. When instructed to do so, the lead should be removed and the handler should walk or run away calling the dog, which should return without delay and be placed on the lead. 7. Controlled greeting - The object is to demonstrate that the dog will not jump up. Should this happen, the handler must be able to successfully instruct the dog to cease. The examiner, or helper, will greet the dog as might be done when entering a house. During this greeting, should the dog jump up, the handler must be able to make the dog cease doing so. 8. Food manners - The object is for the dog to have good manners when aware of people's food. Food should be handled or consumed while the dog, on a loose lead, is taken in close proximity to it. The examiner should be satisfied that the dog has been taken close enough to the food to be aware of it. 9. Examination of the dog - The object is to demonstrate that the dog will allow inspection of its body by a stranger as might be undertaken by a veterinary surgeon. The dog on lead will be required to be placed for inspection of mouth, teeth, throat, eyes, ears and feet when standing, sitting or lying down as required. Other than mild avoidance, the dog should allow inspection without concern. 10. Responsibility and care - The object of this exercise is to test the knowledge of the handler on specific subjects relating to owning a dog. The handler should be able to give six out of eight correct answers from Sections 1 - 2 of the Canine Code & Responsibility. CGC Gold This is the highest level of good citizenship and builds upon the skills learned in the Silver Award. The Gold Award is a natural progression of practical dog training skills and introduces new concepts such as Relaxed Isolation, Stop the Dog and Send the Dog to Bed exercises, which are important in everyday life situations. Most of the test is performed at a public venue - as shown above - thus testing the dog and handler's abilities within a very challenging environment. 1. Road walk - The object is to test the ability of the dog to walk on lead under control beside the handler and for the handler to determine the speed of the walk. This exercise should be carried out at a suitable outdoor location and an occasional tight lead will be acceptable. The handler and dog should walk along a pavement, execute a turn, then stop at the kerb where the dog should remain steady and controlled. On command they should proceed, observing the Highway Code. When reaching the other side they should turn and continue walking making a few changes of pace from normal to slow or fast walking pace. The handler and dog will return across the road to the starting point of the exercise. Distractions should be incorporated such as passing vehicles or bicycles, people, wheelchairs, prams, pushchairs, etc. Note: The turns are only tests of ability to change direction. 2. Return to handler’s side - The object is to be able to bring the dog back under close control during a lead free walk. With the dog off lead and not less than ten paces away, upon instruction, the dog will be called back to the walking handlers side and both should continue together for approximately ten paces. Note: The dog moving loosely at the handler's side, but under control, is quite acceptable and there should not be a halt to complete the exercise. 3. Walk free beside handler - The object is for the dog to be kept close to the handler's side as may be necessary on a walk in the park. This is not heelwork but a test of control while walking with a dog off lead beside its handler for approximately 40 paces. Therefore, it is only necessary for the dog to be kept loosely beside the handler. Two changes of direction will take place and there will be the distraction of another handler passing with a dog on lead. Upon instruction the dog will be placed on lead as a finish to the test. Note: Changes of direction are right and left turns without formality. 4. Stay down in one place - The object is that the dog will stay down on the spot while the handler moves away for two minutes both in and out of sight. This stay will be tested off lead and handlers should place their dogs in the down position. During the test the handler will be asked to move out of sight for approximately half a minute. While in sight handlers will be approximately ten paces away from their dog. Note: This exercise is to see if the dogs will stay down in one place without changing position. 5. Send the dog to bed - The object is to demonstrate control such as might be required in the home. The handler may provide the dog's bed, blanket, mat, or an article of clothing etc. The handler should place the dog's bed in a position determined by the examiner. The handler will stand approximately ten paces from the bed. Upon instruction, the handler will send the dog to bed where the dog will remain until the examiner is satisfied the dog is settled. Note: The dog is not being sent to bed in disgrace. Where possible this exercise should be tested indoors. The bed used should be suitable to the dog under test and no inducement e.g. toys or food should be used during this exercise. 6. Stop the dog - The object is for the handler to stop the dog at a distance in an emergency situation. With the dog off lead and at a distance not less than approximately ten paces away the handler will be instructed to stop the dog on the spot in any position. Note: The dog is expected to respond straight away to the stop command but if moving at speed, will be allowed a reasonable distance to come to a stop. 7. Relaxed isolation - The object is for the dog to be content when left in isolation. During such times the dog should not become agitated, unduly stressed or defensive. The handler should fasten the dog to an approximate two metre line and then move out of sight for two to five minutes as directed. Alternatively the dog may be left in a room on its own providing undetected observation can take place. Examiners should choose appropriate venues when conducting this exercise. Any number of dogs may be tested at the same time provided they are isolated at different locations. It is acceptable for the dog to move around during isolation, however should the dog whine, howl, bark, or indulge in any disruptive activities it may not pass this exercise. Note: Dogs should be tested for their relaxed demeanour in isolation without any prior controls being imposed by the handler. This is not a stay exercise but handlers may settle their dogs before leaving. This is a practical test and no inducement e.g. blankets, toys or food should be used under during this exercise 8. Food manners - The object is for the dog to be fed in an orderly manner. The handler will offer food to the dog either by hand or in a bowl. The dog must wait for permission to eat. After a three to five second pause, the handler will be asked to give the dog an eating command. Note: The dog should not eat until given permission, however if attempting to do so, it is acceptable for the handler to restrain the dog by voice alone. 9. Examination of the dog - The object is to demonstrate that the dog will allow inspection of its body by a stranger as might be undertaken by a veterinary surgeon. The dog on lead will be required to be placed for inspection of mouth, teeth, throat, eyes, ears and feet when standing, sitting or lying down as required. Other than mild avoidance, the dog should allow inspection without concern. Note: It is the responsibility of training officials to ensure that only suitable dogs take part in this exercise. 10. Responsibility and care - The object is to test the knowledge of the handler on this subject. When asked questions by the examiner from the Responsibility and Care numbered list Sections two and three only. Topics covered include;- Other Responsibilities, Children, Barking, Dogs and Stationary Vehicles, Vehicle Travel, Health, Worming, the Country Code, Miscellaneous, Frightening, Out of Control, Biting and Psychology of learning. The questions should not be phrased in an ambiguous manner and where necessary, examiners should rephrase the same question in an attempt to bring out the correct answer from the handler. At the start of each training course, in addition to the description, handlers should be given a copy of the Canine Code and Responsibility and Care sheet. Note: Only one numbered item may constitute a question. The handler should be able to give eight out of ten correct answers from Sections 1 - 6 of the Canine Code & Responsibility. Drop us a line with any questions that you may have.
Please note: As per all of our courses and classes, we do not offer KUSA gradings. We are a training school and hence provide the training for the handler and dog to be able to enter such KUSA events if they so wish. Our gradings are conducted in-house for two reasons: a) to ensure that evaluations are as consistent as possible, which helps us to refine the syllabus and ensure that the value from your training time is maximised, and b) to ensure that people do not feel forced into competitive sports which they may have no interest in. We are more than happy to provide a formal letter stating which levels have been completed at McKaynine should the handler require this. If a handler would like to grade for any discipline both at McKaynine and at KUSA shows, we are happy to provide details of upcoming KUSA shows. Entry at the KUSA shows is typically just for grading i.e. it does not include any training. CGC Bronze CGC Gold CGC Silver Real life skills Home About Us Puppy Training Obedience Canine Good Citizen Other Classes Day Care Schedules Contact Email us Supported by
(C) McKaynine Training Centre Est 1999
Canine Good Citizen
Canine Good Citizen (CGC)

The Canine Good Citizen

programme is designed to teach you

and your dog valuable practical exercises. While

not as "formal" as the classic obedience classes,

the CGC programme still requires precise

obedience, but within a more realistic context.

These courses are ideal for those looking to

train their dog to be a reliable steady

companion in domestic scenarios.

All the CGC levels incorporate typical domestic obedience situations - from meeting a stranger (Bronze) to an out of sight stay (Gold). There are three incremental levels - Bronze, Silver and Gold. We suggest that the dog and handler complete the Elementary Beginner obedience course prior to enrolling in the Bronze CGC. Hundreds of dogs have achieved the various levels of CGC at McKaynine over the years and we consider this one of our proudest achievements - domestic manners is where it’s at! We were the first training school in South Africa to offer CGC training courses in 2002. It is very heartening to see how many other schools and clubs have followed our innovative lead since then.   All final tests are non-competitive but the examiner must be satisfied that dogs are worthy of passing. In order that it be meaningful the testing is carried out rigorously - we are very serious about awarding a McKaynine CGC and maintain a very high standard. A rosette will be awarded when the required standard has been achieved. Select the relevant button below to read about the various grade components... CGC Bronze This level aims to produce a dog that will walk and behave in a controlled manner on the lead, will stay in one position on command, will allow its owner to clean, groom and inspect it. The dog must also be able to be positioned by its handler for inspection i.e. stand, sit or lie down on either side or on its back, all on lead. The dog must come to hand when called. 1. Accepting a stranger - This test is to see that a stranger can approach the dog and handler in a casual, everyday situation. 2. Groom - The evaluator will inspect the dog to see if it appears healthy, is clean and groomed and will permit a stranger such as a vet or groomer to examine it. 3. Putting on a collar and lead - The dog should have a well fitting buckle or slip collar of leather, fabric or chain. Special collars such as pinch or spike collars are not permitted. 4. Present for examination on lead - The purpose of this test is to see if a judge or vet can examine the dog without it becoming aggressive or flinching. 5. Praise/presentation - The test is to demonstrate that a dog can be calmed easily following praise and play and can leave the test in a well-mannered fashion. 6. Release from lead, play with or without toy, recall and attach lead - The purpose of this test is to see if the dog can play happily off lead and be recalled and be put on a lead. 7. Walk on lead without distraction (walking on a loose lead) - The purpose of this test is to demonstrate that the handler is in control. The dog must be on the left side of handler, but need not be in the "heel" position. 8. Walk on lead passing through a door or gate - Dog should walk confidently through door/gate and should not shy away from it. 9. Reaction to another dog - This test is to demonstrate the proper behaviour in the presence of other dogs. 10. Walk on a lead passing people and dogs - The test is to demonstrate that the dog should have no difficulty in walking through pedestrian traffic. The dog will walk around and close to several persons at least four, one of whom should have a dog. 11. Reaction to distractions - This test is to demonstrate the dog is confident at all times when facing a distraction. 12. Lie down and stay to command - Taking reasonable time, the handler commands the dog first to sit and then to lie down, using as many commands as he likes. He must not force the dog into the position. The stay command is given and the handler walks about seven metres from the dog and returns at a natural walking pace to the dog, which must maintain it position until the handler returns and the evaluator gives permission for the dog to move. 13. Supervised isolation - This test is to demonstrate a dog can be left with another person, whilst maintaining its training and good manners. CGC Silver This level aims to build upon the skills learned in the Bronze Award whilst increasing the level of difficulty. The Silver Award is a natural progression of practical dog training skills and introduces new concepts such as the Controlled Greeting, Road Walk and Vehicle Control exercises which are important in everyday life situations.  1. Play with the dog - The object is to demonstrate that the dog will play with its handler. When instructed to do so the handler should commence to play with the dog. Play should be under the handler's control and if it involves articles the dog should readily give them up. 2. Road walk - The object is to test the ability of the dog to walk on lead under control. This exercise should be carried out at a suitable outdoor location and an occasional tight lead will be acceptable. The handler and dog should walk along a pavement, execute a turn and then stop at the kerb where the dog should remain steady and controlled. Having observed the Highway Code, they should proceed to the other side, turn and continue walking. Distractions should be incorporated such as passing vehicles or bicycles, people, wheelchairs, prams, pushchairs, etc. 3. Rejoin handler - The object is for the dog to remain steady while the handler leaves but the dog will rejoin when instructed to do so. 4. Stay in one place for two minutes - The object is that the dog will stay on the spot while the handler moves away for two minutes. The handler should remain in sight. 5. Vehicle Control - The object is for the handler to get the dog in and out of a vehicle in a controlled manner. Without pulling, the dog should be taken on lead towards a vehicle and remain steady whilst the handler opens the vehicle door. The dog should not attempt to get in until instructed but should then enter willingly and the door should be closed. The handler, examiner and, if necessary, a driver will get into the vehicle. The engine should be started and run for a short time to enable the examiner to assess the effect upon the dog which at all times should remain quiet, relaxed, and under control. The dog will then be instructed to exit in an orderly manner. The handler should then close the door with the dog calmly under control. Note: Dogs may be lifted in and out of the vehicle. 6. Come away from distractions - The object is for the handler to remain in control of their dog when there are distractions. The handler should take the dog, on lead, to a gathering of people with dogs also on lead. When instructed to do so, the lead should be removed and the handler should walk or run away calling the dog, which should return without delay and be placed on the lead. 7. Controlled greeting - The object is to demonstrate that the dog will not jump up. Should this happen, the handler must be able to successfully instruct the dog to cease. The examiner, or helper, will greet the dog as might be done when entering a house. During this greeting, should the dog jump up, the handler must be able to make the dog cease doing so. 8. Food manners - The object is for the dog to have good manners when aware of people's food. Food should be handled or consumed while the dog, on a loose lead, is taken in close proximity to it. The examiner should be satisfied that the dog has been taken close enough to the food to be aware of it. 9. Examination of the dog - The object is to demonstrate that the dog will allow inspection of its body by a stranger as might be undertaken by a veterinary surgeon. The dog on lead will be required to be placed for inspection of mouth, teeth, throat, eyes, ears and feet when standing, sitting or lying down as required. Other than mild avoidance, the dog should allow inspection without concern. 10. Responsibility and care - The object of this exercise is to test the knowledge of the handler on specific subjects relating to owning a dog. The handler should be able to give six out of eight correct answers from Sections 1 - 2 of the Canine Code & Responsibility. CGC Gold This is the highest level of good citizenship and builds upon the skills learned in the Silver Award. The Gold Award is a natural progression of practical dog training skills and introduces new concepts such as Relaxed Isolation, Stop the Dog and Send the Dog to Bed exercises, which are important in everyday life situations. Most of the test is performed at a public venue - as shown above - thus testing the dog and handler's abilities within a very challenging environment. 1. Road walk - The object is to test the ability of the dog to walk on lead under control beside the handler and for the handler to determine the speed of the walk. This exercise should be carried out at a suitable outdoor location and an occasional tight lead will be acceptable. The handler and dog should walk along a pavement, execute a turn, then stop at the kerb where the dog should remain steady and controlled. On command they should proceed, observing the Highway Code. When reaching the other side they should turn and continue walking making a few changes of pace from normal to slow or fast walking pace. The handler and dog will return across the road to the starting point of the exercise. Distractions should be incorporated such as passing vehicles or bicycles, people, wheelchairs, prams, pushchairs, etc. Note: The turns are only tests of ability to change direction. 2. Return to handler’s side - The object is to be able to bring the dog back under close control during a lead free walk. With the dog off lead and not less than ten paces away, upon instruction, the dog will be called back to the walking handlers side and both should continue together for approximately ten paces. Note: The dog moving loosely at the handler's side, but under control, is quite acceptable and there should not be a halt to complete the exercise. 3. Walk free beside handler - The object is for the dog to be kept close to the handler's side as may be necessary on a walk in the park. This is not heelwork but a test of control while walking with a dog off lead beside its handler for approximately 40 paces. Therefore, it is only necessary for the dog to be kept loosely beside the handler. Two changes of direction will take place and there will be the distraction of another handler passing with a dog on lead. Upon instruction the dog will be placed on lead as a finish to the test. Note: Changes of direction are right and left turns without formality. 4. Stay down in one place - The object is that the dog will stay down on the spot while the handler moves away for two minutes both in and out of sight. This stay will be tested off lead and handlers should place their dogs in the down position. During the test the handler will be asked to move out of sight for approximately half a minute. While in sight handlers will be approximately ten paces away from their dog. Note: This exercise is to see if the dogs will stay down in one place without changing position. 5. Send the dog to bed - The object is to demonstrate control such as might be required in the home. The handler may provide the dog's bed, blanket, mat, or an article of clothing etc. The handler should place the dog's bed in a position determined by the examiner. The handler will stand approximately ten paces from the bed. Upon instruction, the handler will send the dog to bed where the dog will remain until the examiner is satisfied the dog is settled. Note: The dog is not being sent to bed in disgrace. Where possible this exercise should be tested indoors. The bed used should be suitable to the dog under test and no inducement e.g. toys or food should be used during this exercise. 6. Stop the dog - The object is for the handler to stop the dog at a distance in an emergency situation. With the dog off lead and at a distance not less than approximately ten paces away the handler will be instructed to stop the dog on the spot in any position. Note: The dog is expected to respond straight away to the stop command but if moving at speed, will be allowed a reasonable distance to come to a stop. 7. Relaxed isolation - The object is for the dog to be content when left in isolation. During such times the dog should not become agitated, unduly stressed or defensive. The handler should fasten the dog to an approximate two metre line and then move out of sight for two to five minutes as directed. Alternatively the dog may be left in a room on its own providing undetected observation can take place. Examiners should choose appropriate venues when conducting this exercise. Any number of dogs may be tested at the same time provided they are isolated at different locations. It is acceptable for the dog to move around during isolation, however should the dog whine, howl, bark, or indulge in any disruptive activities it may not pass this exercise. Note: Dogs should be tested for their relaxed demeanour in isolation without any prior controls being imposed by the handler. This is not a stay exercise but handlers may settle their dogs before leaving. This is a practical test and no inducement e.g. blankets, toys or food should be used under during this exercise 8. Food manners - The object is for the dog to be fed in an orderly manner. The handler will offer food to the dog either by hand or in a bowl. The dog must wait for permission to eat. After a three to five second pause, the handler will be asked to give the dog an eating command. Note: The dog should not eat until given permission, however if attempting to do so, it is acceptable for the handler to restrain the dog by voice alone. 9. Examination of the dog - The object is to demonstrate that the dog will allow inspection of its body by a stranger as might be undertaken by a veterinary surgeon. The dog on lead will be required to be placed for inspection of mouth, teeth, throat, eyes, ears and feet when standing, sitting or lying down as required. Other than mild avoidance, the dog should allow inspection without concern. Note: It is the responsibility of training officials to ensure that only suitable dogs take part in this exercise. 10. Responsibility and care - The object is to test the knowledge of the handler on this subject. When asked questions by the examiner from the Responsibility and Care numbered list Sections two and three only. Topics covered include;- Other Responsibilities, Children, Barking, Dogs and Stationary Vehicles, Vehicle Travel, Health, Worming, the Country Code, Miscellaneous, Frightening, Out of Control, Biting and Psychology of learning. The questions should not be phrased in an ambiguous manner and where necessary, examiners should rephrase the same question in an attempt to bring out the correct answer from the handler. At the start of each training course, in addition to the description, handlers should be given a copy of the Canine Code and Responsibility and Care sheet. Note: Only one numbered item may constitute a question. The handler should be able to give eight out of ten correct answers from Sections 1 - 6 of the Canine Code & Responsibility. Drop us a line with any questions that you may have.
Please note: As per all of our courses and classes, we do not offer KUSA gradings. We are a training school and hence provide the training for the handler and dog to be able to enter such KUSA events if they so wish. Our gradings are conducted in-house for two reasons: a) to ensure that evaluations are as consistent as possible, which helps us to refine the syllabus and ensure that the value from your training time is maximised, and b) to ensure that people do not feel forced into competitive sports which they may have no interest in. We are more than happy to provide a formal letter stating which levels have been completed at McKaynine should the handler require this. If a handler would like to grade for any discipline both at McKaynine and at KUSA shows, we are happy to provide details of upcoming KUSA shows. Entry at the KUSA shows is typically just for grading i.e. it does not include any training. CGC Bronze CGC Gold CGC Silver Real life skills Menu
(C) McKaynine Training Centre Est 1999
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